The Key to Energy Efficiency

“In the real estate industry you always hear this phrase, ‘Location, location, location.’ I think for energy management systems the key is ‘Execution, execution, execution.'”[1]

— Sara Lisauskas, Energy Management Systems: Maximizing Energy Savings

What comes to mind when you think of the phrase “energy efficient?” Perhaps you think of LED light bulbs, electric cars, Energy Star appliances, or LEED-certified buildings. But energy efficiency isn’t limited to “green” products or certifications. Continue reading “The Key to Energy Efficiency”

Intrinsically Safe Products for Hazardous Locations

Figure 1

When considering a product for a hazardous location, it is important that the product is appropriately rated for that environment. UL, one of the primary bodies that certifies products for use in hazardous environments, defines a hazardous location as a “location where explosion or fire hazards exist due to the presence of flammable gases, flammable or combustible liquid-produced vapors, combustible dusts, or ignitable fibers or flyings.”[1] Figure 1 shows the conditions that are required to create fire and are often present in hazardous environments: oxygen, an ignition source, and flammable material. Continue reading “Intrinsically Safe Products for Hazardous Locations”

Mechanical vs. Non-Mechanical Flowmeters

Insertion flowmeters provide a great alternative to inline flowmeters because they are typically less expensive and easier to install than inline meters. But how do you know which type of insertion meter to choose?

There are two primary types of insertion flowmeters: mechanical and non-mechanical. It’s vital to understand the application and benefits of each type of meter, to ensure the best instrumentation solution for your application. Continue reading “Mechanical vs. Non-Mechanical Flowmeters”

Drinking Water Regulation

For the past few years, questions about the safety of drinking water have constantly been in the news. Following the 2014 crisis in Flint, Michigan, cities across the U.S. launched their own investigations to determine whether their own drinking water supplies were safe. Drinking water is contaminated when old lead pipes corrode, allowing lead and other chemicals to enter the water supply. While lead is most dangerous when ingested, even outside of potable water applications there are still strict regulations regarding the materials and chemicals that may come in contact with water. This minimizes risk of contamination. Continue reading “Drinking Water Regulation”