The Importance of Calibrating Measurement Instrumentation

Calibrating measurement instrumentation is something that should never go overlooked. To calibrate instrumentation means to determine, check, or rectify the graduation of any instrument giving quantitative measurement. Calibrating a device ensures that the instrument will properly measure within the desired range for your application. This is important because a properly calibrated measurement device will help the user to maintain his or her system. A device can be calibrated either at the factory where the device was manufactured or within the field. Calibration certificates may be obtained once a device has been calibrated. Continue reading “The Importance of Calibrating Measurement Instrumentation”

Understanding Air Velocity Sensors

Stainless Steel Pitot Tube, Series 160

Dwyer Instruments, Inc. offers a multitude of sensors for monitoring air velocity in HVAC systems. Some of this instrumentation has a simple construction (Pitot tubes, for example) while others are more complex, such as hot-wire anemometers.

The initial term and first “hot-wire anemometer” was developed back in 1914 by Louie Vesso King. He is also accredited for King’s Law, which mathematically describes heat transfer in air flows using a heated wire. As the air moves over the wire, it causes a loss of temperature in the wire and removes some of the wire’s heat energy. Continue reading “Understanding Air Velocity Sensors”

The Importance of Regulatory Compliance in a Manufacturing Setting

There are numerous factors that lead to regulatory compliance, including: reputation, image, ethics, competition, and survival. Regulatory is often looked at as the “show-stopper” or obstacle in many manufacturing processes. While regulatory may sometimes be perceived as negative, it can also be the main key to a company’s success. Continue reading “The Importance of Regulatory Compliance in a Manufacturing Setting”

The Intricacy of Proper Instrumentation in Cleaning Produced Water

The cleaning of produced water during oil and gas production and exploration is a crucial, although costly endeavor. In the process of bringing oil and gas up to the surface from a well, several byproducts are also produced. Water is the largest of these byproducts by volume, with 882 billion gallons produced per day. This produced water contains a variety of other compounds and substances, including organic and inorganic compounds, grease, bacteria, and dissolved solids such as iron. Continue reading “The Intricacy of Proper Instrumentation in Cleaning Produced Water”