Pressure Monitoring in Pump Systems

Why do the inlet and outlet pressure of pumps need to be monitored? What issues may be encountered if they are not monitored?

Air compressors, irrigation systems, and heat exchangers all use pumps to push air or water through their systems. If the pressure in any of these systems is too high or too low, it could have serious consequences for the pump, the pipes, or the entire system. Most engineers choose pumps that operate 80-110% of their Best Efficiency Point (BEP), the point on the curve where the pump is most efficient. Pump performance will suffer if the pump is operating outside of the BEP, so it is important to monitor pressure to ensure you are getting the most out of your pumping system. Continue reading “Pressure Monitoring in Pump Systems”

Advantages of V-Ball Valves

Introduction

Ball valves are designed to be used in a variety of applications and markets, but a V-port ball valve offers the added ability to be used as a control valve where necessary. The main differentiator is a contoured V-port in the ball, most commonly available with a 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, or 90° angle, which produces an equal percentage flow characteristic for better control. V-ball valves are known to offer a variety of advantages in flow control applications, especially when compared to larger and more expensive control valves. Continue reading “Advantages of V-Ball Valves”

How is Water Treated for Homes?

Water Treatment Process

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), more than 280 million people get their drinking water from a community water system. Drinking water supplies in the United States are among the safest in the world, but even these water sources can become contaminated. Before fresh water can be considered potable, it must be treated to be made safe for drinking. Systems are set in place to ensure ongoing water quality, which then allows this treated water to be sent through water pipes and into our homes. Continue reading “How is Water Treated for Homes?”

Drinking Water Regulation

For the past few years, questions about the safety of drinking water have constantly been in the news. Following the 2014 crisis in Flint, Michigan, cities across the U.S. launched their own investigations to determine whether their own drinking water supplies were safe. Drinking water is contaminated when old lead pipes corrode, allowing lead and other chemicals to enter the water supply. While lead is most dangerous when ingested, even outside of potable water applications there are still strict regulations regarding the materials and chemicals that may come in contact with water. This minimizes risk of contamination. Continue reading “Drinking Water Regulation”