What is Stability and Why is it Important?

Stability is defined as a change (or lack of change) in accuracy over a period of time.

Drift is commonly used as a specification to illustrate the stability, or change in accuracy over a period of time, commonly shown as X%/year where X = a number; i.e. 0.25%/year. In this scenario, a device with a ±1% accuracy, would be expected to have an accuracy of ±1.25% (1%+0.25%) after a period of one year. Depending on the design, brand, and range of the sensing instrument, the stability can vary widely. Continue reading “What is Stability and Why is it Important?”

Proving Water Flow in Rooftop Air Handlers

We met with an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) last year, who was working on a new design for rooftop air handling equipment. Part of the their design utilized water flow for cooling in a loop.

Low or no-flow conditions can cause major damage to expensive pumps, motors, and other equipment, which could result in extensive downtime and repair costs. In order to prevent this, the customer needed an inexpensive, but reliable and robust method for proving water flow. Continue reading “Proving Water Flow in Rooftop Air Handlers”