Open Channel Flow Monitoring

Open channel flow monitoring is a method of measuring water flow rates in irrigation channels, streams, and storm water systems. It’s also used in wastewater processing for monitoring the effluent discharge. In most applications for open channel flow, weirs and flumes are used. For those of us not familiar, weirs and flumes concentrate the flow into a known cross sectional area, relating an accurate level reading to an accurate flow rate. The height of the water in the channel, going over the weir or flume, is directly proportional to the flow rate. Continue reading “Open Channel Flow Monitoring”

Dirty Jobs | Measuring Livestock Manure Level

Imagine that you’re driving down a country road, and you roll down your window to feel the breeze from the wind. You happen to look to your side as you pass a large barn housing dairy cows. Most of us have seen these farms, but many don’t think about what happens to the manure of the animals or how it is utilized in our everyday lives. Manure slurries and lagoons are a vital function of large scale farms for swine, dairy, and poultry.  Continue reading “Dirty Jobs | Measuring Livestock Manure Level”

Well Water Monitoring for Irrigation Systems

Irrigation is fundamental to the production of food all over the world. Most of us have seen the large center pivot systems used on many farms today, and there are a number of other technologies that are designed to deliver water to crops to allow them to flourish. Less prominent, however, are the systems that collect and deliver water to these irrigation systems to allow for crop growth. Continue reading “Well Water Monitoring for Irrigation Systems”

Intrinsically Safe Products for Hazardous Locations

Figure 1

When considering a product for a hazardous location, it is important that the product is appropriately rated for that environment. UL, one of the primary bodies that certifies products for use in hazardous environments, defines a hazardous location as a “location where explosion or fire hazards exist due to the presence of flammable gases, flammable or combustible liquid-produced vapors, combustible dusts, or ignitable fibers or flyings.”[1] Figure 1 shows the conditions that are required to create fire and are often present in hazardous environments: oxygen, an ignition source, and flammable material. Continue reading “Intrinsically Safe Products for Hazardous Locations”