Pressure Monitoring in Pump Systems

Why do the inlet and outlet pressure of pumps need to be monitored? What issues may be encountered if they are not monitored?

Air compressors, irrigation systems, and heat exchangers all use pumps to push air or water through their systems. If the pressure in any of these systems is too high or too low, it could have serious consequences for the pump, the pipes, or the entire system. Most engineers choose pumps that operate 80-110% of their Best Efficiency Point (BEP), the point on the curve where the pump is most efficient. Pump performance will suffer if the pump is operating outside of the BEP, so it is important to monitor pressure to ensure you are getting the most out of your pumping system. Continue reading “Pressure Monitoring in Pump Systems”

What is Wastewater, and How is it Treated?

Every day, billions of gallons of wastewater are collected from our homes, businesses, and industries. Wastewater is exactly what it sounds like: water that has already been used and disposed of via a tub, toilet, sink, or storm drains. Because it is full of contaminants that make the water no longer suitable for use, it is collected in the sewer system and delivered to plants for treatment to make the water safe to be returned to the environment. Continue reading “What is Wastewater, and How is it Treated?”

What is a Hydronic System and What is Needed to Balance it?

A hydronic system is a system designed to circulate chilled or hot water with the connections between piping and terminal units (heating and/or cooling devices). Most hydronic systems are closed and are usually made in a series loop. In addition to pipes and terminals, valves are placed in this series as a port to balance the differential pressure in the system. The balance of this type of system is often referred to as hydronic or hydraulic balancing. Continue reading “What is a Hydronic System and What is Needed to Balance it?”