Measuring Thermal Energy in Hydronic Systems

So you’ve decided to track how much energy your HVAC system consumes in order to increase the system’s energy efficiency — great! But how will you do it? There are multiple methods that can be used to measure thermal energy in hydronic systems. We’ve outlined several methods below to make it easier for you to select the best technology for your application.  

Measuring thermal energy requires three components: a fluid flow sensor, two temperature sensors (one for inlet temperature, one for outlet temperature), and a calculator. Although thermal energy can technically be measured without a calculator, doing an energy calculation by hand is very complex and can introduce manual calculation error into the measurement. For that reason, we recommend incorporating a calculator into your system for the most accurate energy measurements. This calculator can be either an independent BTU controller, part of your building management system, or integral to a complete thermal energy system. A complete system includes a flowmeter, temperature sensors, and a calculator that are all calibrated together, eliminating the need for multiple pieces of equipment.  Continue reading “Measuring Thermal Energy in Hydronic Systems”

Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR) Carbon Dioxide Sensors

Non-Dispersive Infrared, NDIR, CO2 Sensors

Dwyer offers several carbon dioxide measuring products that use non-dispersive infrared sensors as the sensing element. Carbon dioxide sensors are commonly used in building automation systems to monitor air quality.  The level of carbon dioxide is indirectly proportional to the amount of people in a space and can be used to adjust ventilation for the space.

There are two basic types of gas sensing technologies: chemical reaction and infrared spectroscopic. Most chemical reaction sensors are electrochemical sensors, which are not as reliable as they can interact with multiple gases and wear from interaction with the gas. Continue reading “Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR) Carbon Dioxide Sensors”

Product Highlight: Series MSX Pro Magnesense® Differential Pressure Transmitter

The Dwyer team recently released the Series MSX Pro Magnesense® Differential Pressure Transmitter, which meets stringent industry standards with innovative global product design. This series is ideal for monitoring building control applications, and also utilizes enhanced accuracy and stability for use in high performance, critical environments. Continue reading “Product Highlight: Series MSX Pro Magnesense® Differential Pressure Transmitter”

Protect Your Capital Assets: Water Leak Detection

When it comes to Building Automation and Management Systems, companies invest in the latest and greatest technologies to optimize their process efficiency. Many hours and thousands of dollars are spent to ensure minimum power consumption and reduced heating and cooling costs. However, the conversation of protecting these capital investments are a less frequent topic of discussion. Additionally, protecting the structural integrity of the facilities can be an afterthought. Any sign of moisture and leakage can be the beginning of a serious component failure. For this type of monitoring, Dwyer Instruments, Inc. offers the Model WD Water Leak Detector for protection against potential water or liquid damage. Continue reading “Protect Your Capital Assets: Water Leak Detection”

Parking Garage Ventilation Control

Carbon Monoxide/Nitrogen Dioxide Gas Transmitter, Series GSTA

The Series GSTA carbon monoxide/nitrogen dioxide gas transmitters offer a robust, low cost alternative to standalone garage ventilation control packages.

As cities around the world continue to grow, the need for parking becomes an integral part of new commercial and municipal building plans. Many building designers are finding ways to offer adequate parking in a limited amount of real estate. Two emerging trends to do so are enclosed parking garages and mixed-use parking garages. Both of these designs seek to offer users a comfortable way to park their vehicles, all while being near their final destination. This means that the parking facility and the commercial or residential buildings are not separated, but are integrated together into one building structure. Due to this integration, two major concerns arise. How do we ventilate the harmful exhaust from the vehicles while being so close to the populated areas of the building, which require clean air and how do we accomplish this in the most energy efficient way possible? The Dwyer® Series GSTA carbon monoxide/nitrogen dioxide gas transmitters offer the sensory inputs necessary for any building automation system to answer this very quandary in an efficient and low cost manner. Continue reading “Parking Garage Ventilation Control”