What is Sick Building Syndrome and How Can You Prevent It?

As weather gets cooler, it’s a common misconception that cold and flu viruses are more frequent due to the temperatures outside. This can actually be attributed to the fact that we are inside more, thus being exposed to higher concentrations of pollutants. Poor indoor air quality can cause what has come to be known as sick building syndrome.

Continue reading “What is Sick Building Syndrome and How Can You Prevent It?”

Back to School: Precautions for Building Readiness

As students are returning to schools and office buildings are being reopened, it’s important to consider the safety of the buildings after extensive closures. Proper precautions need to be taken to ensure building readiness, which introduces a critical question: 

How do you return the HVAC system back to normal operations (and continued operations)?  Continue reading “Back to School: Precautions for Building Readiness”

Parking Garage Ventilation Control

Carbon Monoxide/Nitrogen Dioxide Gas Transmitter, Series GSTA

The Series GSTA carbon monoxide/nitrogen dioxide gas transmitters offer a robust, low cost alternative to standalone garage ventilation control packages.

As cities around the world continue to grow, the need for parking becomes an integral part of new commercial and municipal building plans. Many building designers are finding ways to offer adequate parking in a limited amount of real estate. Two emerging trends to do so are enclosed parking garages and mixed-use parking garages. Both of these designs seek to offer users a comfortable way to park their vehicles, all while being near their final destination. This means that the parking facility and the commercial or residential buildings are not separated, but are integrated together into one building structure. Due to this integration, two major concerns arise. How do we ventilate the harmful exhaust from the vehicles while being so close to the populated areas of the building, which require clean air and how do we accomplish this in the most energy efficient way possible? The Dwyer® Series GSTA carbon monoxide/nitrogen dioxide gas transmitters offer the sensory inputs necessary for any building automation system to answer this very quandary in an efficient and low cost manner. Continue reading “Parking Garage Ventilation Control”

How is Stability Related to ASHRAE 62.1 Standards?

ASHRAE 62.1 Standard for Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality provides recommendations for minimum ventilation rates and other parameters to ensure good indoor air quality (IAQ). Keeping the IAQ at a safe level will help to minimize any adverse health effects caused by air quality factors. 

The 62.1 standard is intended for both new building and building addition projects. It can also be used as a guide for the improvement of IAQ in existing buildings.

In order to properly conform to the ASHRAE 62.1 standard, it is necessary for sensors to be both stable and accurate. Continue reading “How is Stability Related to ASHRAE 62.1 Standards?”

Energy Savings from On-Demand Ventilation

Most local regulations for indoor air quality are designed around ASHRAE Standard 62. This standard specifies the minimum amount of outdoor air flow into an occupied space to be between 15 to 60 CFM per person, but more commonly building regulations require 15 to 20 CFM per person. Besides actually measuring the air flow, ASHRAE also defines indoor air quality using the concentration of carbon dioxide gas in the air. Carbon dioxide is recommended to be less than 1000 PPM. When sizing the air handling unit for a building, engineers will make the design exceed the maximum occupancy in the building or space to ensure that they will always be able to meet the minimum air requirements. In most cases, buildings or mix used spaces rarely are occupied at these maximum levels, thus the amount of conditioned air supplied is usually much greater than what is required. As building owners aim to reduce energy costs and operate buildings more efficiently, wasted energy of conditioning unneeded outside air has been a good place to start. Continue reading “Energy Savings from On-Demand Ventilation”