What is a Particulate Matter Sensor and How Does it Work?

There are many methods of detecting air quality within a room and in outdoor environments. One of these methods is to measure particulates. Particulate matter can vary in size, and particles 10 micrometers and below are inhalable. (epa.gov) Inhaling particulates like dust, pollen, and smoke can have serious short and long-term impacts on health. Continue reading “What is a Particulate Matter Sensor and How Does it Work?”

Flow Monitoring in Emergency Safety Shower and Eyewash Stations

If you work with hazardous substances in your job, one of the first things you probably learned besides “Where’s the bathroom?” and “Where is my workstation?” is the location of the emergency safety shower and eyewash station. These emergency areas are vital to keeping workplace injuries to a minimum in laboratories and other hazardous areas. Continue reading “Flow Monitoring in Emergency Safety Shower and Eyewash Stations”

How Pressurized Stairwells Keep You Safe

Picture this: You wake up with a start to the sound of crackling flames and the screech of an alarm. A nearby apartment room has caught fire, and you need to get out before it spreads to the rest of the building. You go through the motions; grab the keys, check the door knob, keep low to the ground. You head to the stairs and make your way outside to safety. 

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How is Paper Made?

The crisp touch of a page, the smoothness of a glossy photograph. Despite using paper for so much throughout our lives, many do not know much about how paper is created besides the vague notion that it comes from trees. In fact, there are several steps for paper to transition from the forest into your hands.

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Protecting Lunar Samples from Contamination

For as long as humanity has been looking up at the sky, we’ve wondered what lay beyond the ground beneath our feet. When the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission took their first steps in 1969, the world saw a future filled with spaceships and rockets. We dreamed of a lack of gravity, fueled by grainy images on a TV and the words of Neil Armstrong: “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” The Apollo 17 mission in 1972 was the last trip to the moon for several decades.

Lunar science has become a thriving field of study which helps to define our knowledge of the formation of the universe. The lunar rock and soil samples gathered by Apollo astronauts are still studied to this day. 

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