Importance of Sensor Stability in Healthcare Isolation Rooms

Magnehelic® Gages Monitoring Isolation Room Pressure

The purpose of a healthcare isolation room is to prevent patients with contagious illnesses from spreading to others or to keep immunocompromised patients safe from exposure to airborne pathogens. As such, there exist two types of isolation rooms, either positively or negatively pressurized. 

Positive pressure isolation rooms are designed to keep pathogens and outside air from entering the room, i.e. air inside the room is forced outward and is typically used for immunocompromised patients. Like clean rooms, it is important to maintain proper positive pressure within the protective isolation room to keep the patients safe. Continue reading “Importance of Sensor Stability in Healthcare Isolation Rooms”

How is Stability Related to ASHRAE 62.1 Standards?

ASHRAE 62.1 Standard for Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality provides recommendations for minimum ventilation rates and other parameters to ensure good indoor air quality (IAQ). Keeping the IAQ at a safe level will help to minimize any adverse health effects caused by air quality factors. 

The 62.1 standard is intended for both new building and building addition projects. It can also be used as a guide for the improvement of IAQ in existing buildings.

In order to properly conform to the ASHRAE 62.1 standard, it is necessary for sensors to be both stable and accurate. Continue reading “How is Stability Related to ASHRAE 62.1 Standards?”

Select Key Pressure Measurements and Their Importance

Last September, we wrote about the different types of pressure and how each type is referenced. This post discussed atmospheric (barometric), absolute, gage, vacuum, differential, and hydrostatic pressure. For a refresher on these pressure types, click here. This post will expand on last September’s post by listing some more key pressure measurements and explaining their importance. Continue reading “Select Key Pressure Measurements and Their Importance”