What is Pressure and How is it Referenced?

Many Dwyer Instruments, Inc. products sense and measure pressure. This includes: gages, manometers, transmitters and switches.

Pressure is the amount of force acting on a specific area and is equal to the force divided by the area.

There are many types of pressure that are used and measured, including: atmospheric, absolute, gage, vacuum, differential and hydrostatic. Continue reading “What is Pressure and How is it Referenced?”

Magnehelic® Differential Pressure Gage Minor Divisions Update

Magnehelic® Differential Pressure Gages, Series 2000

Over the years, Dwyer Instruments, Inc. has continuously improved its position as a global leader in designing and manufacturing innovative controls, sensors and instrumentation solutions. This success is due in part to our invention of the Magnehelic® differential pressure gage in 1953. Since then, the market leading Magnehelic® differential pressure gage has been continuously updated and improved. The Magnehelic® gage is a versatile low differential pressure gage which quickly indicates air or noncorrosive gas pressures – either positive, negative (vacuum) or differential. Over the years, among countless other updates, we’ve invented a high accuracy version of the Magnehelic® gage which provides an accuracy within 1% of full scale and created backwards compatible products. Continue reading “Magnehelic® Differential Pressure Gage Minor Divisions Update”

Market Shifts & the Need for Backward Compatible Products

Technology markets shift.  The shift can be incremental, radical, or sometimes disruptive.

Take, for instance, gages used in process automation markets. Gages command about $3.5 billion in global instrument sales, the major portion, over $11 billion now held by transmitters.

Source: Markets & markets

The technological shift from a visual indication gage to the first transmitter has been incremental. It has taken over 50 years for transmitters to go from concept to commanding 70% market share. Continue reading “Market Shifts & the Need for Backward Compatible Products”