Market Shifts & the Need for Backward Compatible Products

Technology markets shift.  The shift can be incremental, radical, or sometimes disruptive.

Take, for instance, gages used in process automation markets. Gages command about $3.5 billion in global instrument sales, the major portion, over $11 billion now held by transmitters.

Source: Markets & markets

The technological shift from a visual indication gage to the first transmitter has been incremental. It has taken over 50 years for transmitters to go from concept to commanding 70% market share. Continue reading “Market Shifts & the Need for Backward Compatible Products”

Flow Measurement with Orifice Plates

Dwyer Instruments, Inc. offers many types of flow measuring products including orifice plates, which are used as a flow sensing element with a differential pressure monitor.

Orifice Plates

Orifice plates are a primary flow element, detecting the flow of a fluid passing through the plate by sensing the pressure drop across the plate. When a fluid flows through a restriction in a pipe, it creates a pressure difference between upstream and downstream of the restriction. This pressure difference is proportional to flow rate according to Bernoulli’s principal, similar to a Pitot tube.  Orifice plates are commonly used as they are simple to use, low cost, work with gases or liquids, and require low maintenance.  Adversely, they do have large pressure losses with about 50% of the pressure drop not recoverable.  Continue reading “Flow Measurement with Orifice Plates”

The Making of a Market Leader – The Magnehelic® Differential Pressure Gage

The name of the Magnehelic® Differential Pressure Gage was derived from the terms Magnet and the Helix. The Magnehelic® Gage is a simple yet elegant solution, which solved a problem faced by customers who wanted to measure low differential pressure. Historically the industry measured differential
Molded Plastic Manometers Series Mark II

pressure with a liquid filled manometer. The manometer worked on the principle that the difference in air pressure is measured as a function of gravity and liquid density. The challenge, however, was that the liquid in the manometer evaporates over time. This means that individuals would need to regularly add more liquid and re-calibrate the device. Continue reading “The Making of a Market Leader – The Magnehelic® Differential Pressure Gage”